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What Secondhand Jewelry Means to 7 Different Women

Aquazzura, pearl pumps,

#FashionCrisis is a series that kicks off Teen Vogue’s commitment to educating our readers about sustainability and fashion. We chat with experts, influencers, designers, beauty and fashion brands about what it really means to be sustainable in 2020. In this story, we chat with seven women about how their family jewels play a bigger role in their approach to conscious consumerism.” data-reactid=”12″>#FashionCrisis is a series that kicks off Teen Vogue’s commitment to educating our readers about sustainability and fashion. We chat with experts, influencers, designers, beauty and fashion brands about what it really means to be sustainable in 2020. In this story, we chat with seven women about how their family jewels play a bigger role in their approach to conscious consumerism.

helped define the past decade, and there’s no sign of stopping this conscious-shopping movement. Now more than ever, young adults care about the impact of their shopping habits and are gravitating toward companies that share the same level of concern and awareness. When you consider how many liters of water it takes to make a single T-shirt, it’s no wonder thrifting is overtaking fast fashion.” data-reactid=”13″>Secondhand shopping helped define the past decade, and there’s no sign of stopping this conscious-shopping movement. Now more than ever, young adults care about the impact of their shopping habits and are gravitating toward companies that share the same level of concern and awareness. When you consider how many liters of water it takes to make a single T-shirt, it’s no wonder thrifting is overtaking fast fashion.

access to designer archives — thrifting and vintage shopping have become the talk in every caption. And as the desire to score vintage finds has increased, so has the number of curated vintage boutiques that live solely on Instagram.” data-reactid=”14″>Social media also plays a big role in this consumer shift. Posting vintage finds on IG is one way to showcase a unique style. Just peep the Kardashian klan’s access to designer archives — thrifting and vintage shopping have become the talk in every caption. And as the desire to score vintage finds has increased, so has the number of curated vintage boutiques that live solely on Instagram.

For others still, the love of clothing and jewelry from way back when starts at home. Secondhand items come from the legacy of past generations — memories made tangible as they are resurrected through their new wearer. Whether it’s a fur coat, a gold watch, or a pair of kitten heels, they’re family jewels.

@usominne” data-reactid=”17″>Minne Atairu, Artist and UX Designer, @usominne

Courtesy of Minne Atairu.

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@lizcoulbourn” data-reactid=”40″>Liz Coulbourn, Junior Designer at Teen Vogue, @lizcoulbourn

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My approach has always been buying secondhand and recycling my own clothing. Shopping secondhand, vintage, and thrifted is great not only when it comes to clothes, but also when looking for furniture and things for my apartment. Since living in New York, I can’t fit half the clothes I wish to in my apartment, so I try and donate or sell clothes to give them another life.

@jessica_manning” data-reactid=”66″>Jessica Manning, Singer and Vintage Shop Owner, @jessica_manning

Courtesy of Jessica Manning. 

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Mae Vintage. Mae is the middle name I share with both of my grandmothers, who have now both passed on but who left me with so many beautiful pieces to remember them by. This felt like the perfect way to honor them.” data-reactid=”89″>I’d say that about half of my closet is thrifted or vintage and the rest is mostly made up of modern sustainable brands. Hunting for vintage pieces has become such a love of mine, and quite honestly, even therapeutic. About six months ago I launched a little vintage shop of my own called Mae Vintage. Mae is the middle name I share with both of my grandmothers, who have now both passed on but who left me with so many beautiful pieces to remember them by. This felt like the perfect way to honor them.

@miniti” data-reactid=”90″>Sara Negrón, Artist and Content Creator, @miniti

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anti-LGBTQ+, and as part of the community, I refuse to support it. Another way I try to be sustainable with fashion is doing closet exchanges with my friends. I’ve also seen some of them selling a few of their clothing items through Instagram Stories or apps like Depop, which I’ve yet to take part in but admire them for it. Although I agree and understand the importance of sustainable shopping and fashion, the reality is that it’s difficult — if not near-impossible — to be 100% sustainable if you don’t have a higher income than, say, the average young adult. Efforts are always made, but unfortunately, I still have to rely on fast fashion most of the time.” data-reactid=”113″>Aside from these stores, my knowledge is we only have the Salvation Army as a “big” thrift store. There’s no Goodwill or other widely known nonprofits aimed at a similar market. However, the Salvation Army has a history of being anti-LGBTQ+, and as part of the community, I refuse to support it. Another way I try to be sustainable with fashion is doing closet exchanges with my friends. I’ve also seen some of them selling a few of their clothing items through Instagram Stories or apps like Depop, which I’ve yet to take part in but admire them for it. Although I agree and understand the importance of sustainable shopping and fashion, the reality is that it’s difficult — if not near-impossible — to be 100% sustainable if you don’t have a higher income than, say, the average young adult. Efforts are always made, but unfortunately, I still have to rely on fast fashion most of the time.

@imanimodus” data-reactid=”114″>Imani Aldridge, Content Creator, @imanimodus

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Courtesy of Alexandra Diaz.

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